Atlanta Police Department Cracking Down On Digital Drug Dealing

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    Nowadays, the majority of shopping is done online rather than in physical stores. Search engines play a big part in this digital shift, as wholly 93% of all online experiences begin with some sort of online search. In Atlanta, criminals are finding ways to take advantage of the digital age in order to sell illegal drugs.

    “This is probably an easy way to make some money real quick,” said Lt. Jeff Cantin of the Atlanta Police Department.

    According to CBS 46, Cantin found a website that is selling LSD, MDMA, and Mephedrone.

    “Those are the three drugs on that website that are Schedule I, which have no medical value and those are the ones we can arrest you for,” added Cantin, who works on the Atlanta Police Narcotics Unit.

    The website Cantin discovered is registered to an Atlanta man named Sammy Chunga. Chunga, who has a Facebook account, does not have a physical or online presence anywhere else, prompting the authorities to believe the name is being used as an alias.

    Part of the difficulty of finding who is responsible for websites like this is the lack of reporting from people using the site. Even though they are being scammed, they are less likely to call the police because of their illegal activity in the first place.

    “What are you going to tell police? I bought illegal drugs online and they took my money?” Canton added.

    According to Online Athens, four other men were arrested for conspiracy to deal drugs in Atlanta after heroin was being advertised on Facebook.

    U.S. Attorney John Horn said that Atlanta police received a tip that Bernard Stokley, also known as “Big Pat,” was advertising heroin on his Facebook and Snapchat page and offering “specials of the day.”

    In addition to Stokley, Tobias Ellison, Alvin Hugley, and Vance Hoard all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute heroin. They will be sentenced on April 20, 2017.

    “The days of people standing on street corners, or standing in front of gas stations, that’s going away,” said Cantin.